This is part of Swissvale Community Action Committee's 2020 Primary Candiate Guide.

US House of Representatives, PA District 18

Pennsylvania's 18th Congressional District includes Swissvale, the City of Pittsburgh, and many surrounding municipalities.

The candidates for the 2020 PA Primary are Jerry Dickinson (challenger, Democrat), Mike Doyle (incumbent, Democrat), Luke Negron (challenger, Republican), and Kim Mack (write-in challenger, Republican.)

Jerry S. Dickinson, Democrat • Challenger

Jerry Dickinson, US Congressional Candidate
📣 Endorsed by SCAC

Please introduce yourself and your campaign.

My name is Jerry Dickinson - I am a professor of law, a housing rights activist, a husband, and a father. I am running for Congress because for too long government and our politicians have been run for the benefit of the privileged few. While corporate profits go up, wages stay down. While healthcare companies thrive, people suffer. While certain neighborhoods are celebrated for their charm, others are left to decay until predatory developers swoop in. While the fossil fuel industries rake in profits, our air and water are choked by their pollution. Enough is enough. I was born into the Allegheny county foster system and grew up in Shaler with my ten other foster and adoptive siblings. Together, we have struggled through many of the same difficulties that ordinary Pennsylvanians face every day: joblessness, homelessness, illness, addiction, and incarceration. I have been inside prison walls pleading for fair treatment for my siblings. I have helped them struggle with drug addiction. I have watched as they worked two and three jobs at a time trying to make ends meet. For decades, the same old politicians have played the same old politics. It’s time for change. We need to act boldly and urgently to confront the crises we face. We cannot wait any longer. I will fight each and every day for a better tomorrow for all, through healthcare reform, combating the climate crisis, and working for a more equal, more just tomorrow.

Pennsylvania’s school districts have the most inequitable spending for poor students in the nation. How can your office work toward equitable funding across school districts, reduce segregation in school systems, and ensure that everyone has access to a high-quality education?

I, as well as all of my siblings and my parents, am a proud graduate of the public school system, having attended Shaler High. My wife, Emily, and I are both educators; she teaches at the Western Pennsylvania School for the Deaf and I am a law professor at Pitt. A high-quality, free, and equal public education system is the key to our future. We need to carry out massive reforms to the system, starting from the way schools are funded to the paths available to students as they grow. On the federal level, we can push for better funding formulas. We can advocate for and incentivize intentional de-segregation of school districts. I will also fight to end the use of federal funding to pay for religious schools and privileged private schools through the voucher system Also, we need to do more to end the school-to-prison pipeline, which disproportionately affects communities of colors. We need school resource officers, mental health professionals, and counselors, not police officers, in our schools. We need to ban discriminatory policies on hair and gender and regressive policies like truancy laws that punish families.

Over the past two decades, crime has fallen, but the population of Allegheny County Jail rose by 70%. What can your office do to end mass incarceration, and heal the communities it has harmed the most? Which offenses will you work to decriminalize?

Criminal justice reform, like most of the issues I’m passionate about, is personal to me from my lived experience. I have been inside those prison walls, fighting to get my siblings a fair deal, for humane treatment, and for support. I will never stop fighting to make our criminal justice system more fair and more helpful because of all the ways that it has failed my family and my communities. In general, I believe that we must move from a carcerative model to a rehabilitative model of justice. We need to treat the root causes of crime – such as inequality, systemic racism, and mental health – and aim to help rather than hurt those who have been found guilty. First, I will immediately call for a ban on private for-profit prisons and for a ban on inhumane solitary confinement. Both of those should have no place at all in our society. Instead, I will propose that we take the funds saved from eliminating those costly and ineffective programs and use them to provide better healthcare, mental and social health, and rehabilitative and support services. I will also push for diversionary programs, expungement of old records, the legalization of marijuana, and the end of the war on drugs. In my family’s experience, one of the biggest hurdles to escaping the revolving door of the prison system was finding post-release services and jobs. Without helping former inmates reintegrate into society, we’re dooming them to an ever worsening cycle from which there is no escape.

The Pittsburgh region has the most air pollution-related deaths of any city outside of California. What measures will you take to ensure that our area’s environmental pollution and air quality improve dramatically?

We need aggressive, immediate action on pollution. That’s why I support a 2030 clean energy target instead of the 2050 target. That’s also why I don’t take any money from the fossil fuel and energy industries, unlike the incumbent who take hundreds of thousands of dollars from them every year and then says that we can wait until 2050. First, I will work to restore the EPA clean air and water regulations that have been gutted by the Trump administration. Then we will bother restore and increase the EPA’s funding and its ability to enforce those regulations. I will also move to take tax breaks away from polluting industries – like fossil fuels – and apply them to incentivizing a shift towards clean energy and green manufacturing instead. I am also completely opposed to the construction of the Beaver county petrochemical cracker plant, which will emit roughly twice as much pollution as the Clairton coke works. The future of our city and our planet cannot be tied to the petrochemical and fossil fuel industries.

Rising temperatures increase the intensity of floods. Precipitation from extremely heavy storms has increased by 70% in the Northeast since 1958. What can your office do to address the climate crisis, and to mitigate its effects in our area?

The climate crisis is one of my absolute top priorities, alongside healthcare reform. As I said above, we need aggressive, immediate action. That’s why I support the Green New Deal and will fight to actualize its principles. Of particular importance is the 2030 goal. It is much more ambitious and difficult than the 2050 goal supported by the incumbent, but I believe that the climate crisis can demand nothing less than urgent, aggressive, and bold action. We can and we must shift to a green growth economy; here in Pittsburgh, we’ll take our brilliant educational and tech resources, combine them with our powerful manufacturing and labor infrastructure, and create whole new sectors of jobs. These won’t just be tech jobs – we’ll show America how to create new growth industries, like sustainable manufacturing of wind turbines, solar panels, energy storage solutions, and who knows what else. These jobs will utilize the skills and experience of our labor force without requiring them to change to whole new skillsets and the industries will be growing, not shrinking like the old mainstays of steel and fossil fuels. We also need to shift rapidly to a sustainable energy infrastructure nationwide. First, I’ll fight to ban fracking and the exploitation of our national lands and waters for fossil fuels. I’ll also oppose any new fossil fuel infrastructure and instead push for harder emissions limits. We can also take the millions of dollars in tax breaks away from the fossil fuel industry and instead apply them to green energy sources to encourage research and innovation.

Nearly 700,000 Pennsylvanians do not have health insurance. How can your office ensure residents are getting the care that they need?

Healthcare reform is my other top priority. For too long, I have watched my family members and loved ones struggle to get coverage or to pay for ever more exorbitant medical bills. More than half of all bankruptcies in America are related to medical expenses. And now, the COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the flaws in the system like never before. That’s why I will work to build a pathway to Medicare for All and comprehensive healthcare reform. To me, comprehensive healthcare includes mental health, reproductive rights, and LGBTQIA+ health as well as national paid family leave and sick leave policies. Comprehensive healthcare must be available, affordable, and accessible to all. I will fight loud and hard every day until universal coverage and single payer healthcare is our reality. From a strong Democratic seat like Pittsburgh, it would be my duty and my honor to fight to push the envelope. We also need federal negotiation for drug prices because it’s absurd that thousands of Americans have to choose between buying lifesaving medicine and having enough money for groceries. Furthermore, we must have nationwide paid sick leave policies. Study after study – and now the reality of COVID-19 – have shown that paid sick and family leave policies make everyone safer and healthier. I will also make sure that women’s health and reproductive rights are guaranteed in any federal healthcare package. Unlike the incumbent, who, in his own words, opposed abortion throughout almost his entire career, I believe that women have a right to their bodies and their healthcare decisions.

Pittsburgh is one of the most gentrified cities in the US. How can your office work to address the rent inflation that is pushing residents farther away from the city and the greater metro area?

My entire adult life, I’ve fought to protect people’s rights to their homes. After college, I spent my Fulbright scholarship advocating for squatters in the slums and shantytowns of Johannesburg, South Africa. As an attorney, I helped found the Housing Rights Project at Reed Smith that gives free legal representation to low-income residents who are fighting eviction. Most recently, I helped create the Hill District’s community land trust – the first of its kind in a majority black community in Pittsburgh. Gentrification is both a cause and consequence of the ever widening inequality gap. We need to protect communities from predation by greedy developers that place profits over people. As part of that, I will help shape legislature that makes it easier for communities to create community land trusts and other similar cooperative structures. It isn’t about freezing improvements or progress but about making sure that the improvements and profits go to the members of the community and not to faceless corporations. We also need a new schema for creating affordable and rent stabilized housing throughout our district. The current system pushes too many of the lowest income earners into smaller pockets of concentrated poverty and sets up competition between those who can least afford it. Instead, we should broaden the idea of affordable housing to make sure that the burden and benefit are distributed fairly across the board. I’ll also introduce vacancy and second-home taxes that disincentivize wealthy landlords from holding empty lots and price gauging. Simultaneously, I’ll push for tax abatements tied to rent stabilization or affordable pricing on rental units to further expand affordable housing stock.

Over 90,000 people in Pennsylvania earn minimum wage or less, and our minimum wage has been stagnant at $7.25/ hr since 2009. What can your office do to ensure that all PA residents are paid a fair wage, and are able to afford necessities?

As the COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated, the truly essential workers in our society aren’t the hedge fund managers and corporate executives but rather maintenance workers, grovery store clerks, delivery drivers, and public interest workers. People whose jobs are “life-sustaining” should be paid life-sustaining wages and benefits. I will push to make the $15/hr minimum wage a reality for all and then to tie federal minimum wage policies to economic indicators so that it never again stagnates in the halls of congress while rich politicians and lobbyists kick the can down the road. But it’s not just the wage rate itself, it’s about workers’ rights and the massive inequities in pay. We also need national paid family leave and paid sick leave policies. We need to make it easier for workers to unionize and to have a say in how their unions and their companies are directed. Finally, comprehensive healthcare reform like Medicare for All and the jobs guarantee in the Green New Deal will alleviate so many of the worries and burdens that weigh on our wage earners. It won’t be easy, but we really can make broad changes and improve the lives of millions.

Commute times are the strongest indicator of whether a household can emerge from poverty. How can your office strengthen and support our public transportation?

Our nation needs to rethink its relationship with cars and travel. It’s absurd that so many neighborhoods in Pittsburgh and across America are barely accessible by any other means. From Braddock Hills to McKeesport to Plum and Elizabeth, there are simply not enough ways to get around. The few bus lines that exist are scarce and the “stops” are frequently just a sign at the side of the busy road, with safe way to get there or to wait. All too often, the struggling neighborhoods who need public transit systems the most are the least likely to get them. Furthermore, strengthening public transit is key to reducing America’s emissions and fighting against the climate crisis. So, instead of giving millionaires tax breaks on yachts and bailing out executives with golden parachutes, I will put federal dollars into strengthening transit systems in urban and exurban areas. We’ll incentivize green buses and trains, give neighborhood block grants for improving the safety and accessibility of transit stops, and work with area governments to prioritize bus lanes and other proven transit strategies. But, in the midst of all of this, I will also make sure that the transit systems serve best those who need it most and not just the privileged few.

Throughout the US, reproductive rights, health, and justice are under attack at the state level. What can your office do to protect and expand upon existing rights to bodily autonomy?

Reproductive health and rights are a fundamental part of comprehensive healthcare and must be protected and upheld. Indeed, for almost his entire career, the incumbent described himself as “opposed to abortion” and a consistent supporter of the Hyde Amendment (which bans federal funds for aboritons). I will introduce and support legislation fully restoring funding to critical healthcare providers like Planned Parenthood. Much of the recent attacks on these rights have been at the state level and I would be an outspoken advocate and public leader in the fight against restrictive rules like the so-called heartbeat bills. It isn’t enough to just sign your name on a bill, the elected representative from this district must be a champion for those rights.

What can your office do to increase voter representation and engagement?

The central premise of my campaign has been that for too long the government and politicians have been working for the privileged few. Everywhere that I’ve been meeting voters, from Plum down to West Elizabeth and from South Versailles to Monroeville, people feel unheard and forgotten. While politicians like the incumbent trumpet the success of tech and healthcare companies downtown, the rest of the district is still waiting for someone to help pull them up too. That’s why I have spent so much of my campaign on the ground in our EveryBody EveryBoro effort where I’ve knocked doors and talked with voters in all 50+ municipalities within the district. Everywhere we went, I met people who had never interacted with a candidate or representative, who didn’t even know who the incumbent was, and who felt that their concerns were unheard. One of the key problems is that corporations have bought our politics. I want to represent the real people of this district, not just the richest businesses, and that’s why I have pledged not to take any money from corporate PACs or from the fossil fuel industry. Meanwhile, the incumbent continues to take hundreds of thousands of dollars every single year. I will also push to make our elections fairer, more accessible, and more representative, here and across the nation. Mail-in voting should be a national norm so that people with mobility and health issues and who may otherwise require assistance or additional time can vote. We should also re-enfranchise former inmates and certainly not use prisons as a way to gerrymander districts. Primaries should use ranked choice or other similar voting schemes so that more people can vote with the confidence that their vote and their voice will be heard. Finally, I am committed to passing a Constitutional amendment to overturn the disastrous Citizens United decision by the Supreme Court which allows corporations to buy our politics and our governments. Election campaigns should be campaigns to represent the will of the people, not the corporations and industries that can donate the most money.

Kim Mack, Republican • Write-In Challenger

Kim Mack, US Congressional Candidate
Kim Mack, US Congressional Candidate

Please introduce yourself and your campaign.

Kimberly (Kim) Mack was born in McKeesport, PA and raised in NYC. Has been living in McKeesport, PA since May 2000. Military Widow (US Army), Mother of 4, Grandmother, Retired from NYC Transit Authority. Highly Successful Grassroots Advocate and Activist fighting for ALL people for 30+ years. Our REAL chance to defeat Mike Doyle and take OUR VOICES and OUR VOTES BACK! I am a Frederick Douglass Republican who believes that EVERYONE SHOULD VOTE THEIR VALUES.

Pennsylvania’s school districts have the most inequitable spending for poor students in the nation. How can your office work toward equitable funding across school districts, reduce segregation in school systems, and ensure that everyone has access to a high-quality education?

Education IS the civil rights issue of our time! The COVID-19 quarantine has changed the face of education nationwide. Children are currently distance learning at home. I currently have a displaced college junior. Most of what I am going to say is based on the old model of education, where children actually attended local schools in person. I will also include my thoughts on what the “new normal” with social distancing in schools may look like at the end of my response. I must repeat : Education IS the civil rights issue of our time! A poorly educated nation WILL NOT prosper. Equity vs. Equality: We can strive to be more equitable in education, with tax generated monies on federal and state levels, because equality is not readily achievable because of the local wealth disparities of PA school districts. I am a member of the Education Policy and Leadership Center (EPLC) and have been since 2005. I have been a grassroots advocate and lobbyist for eduction in NY from 1981-2000; and in PA from 2000-present. I have served in various educational capacities: as PTA/PTO Vice President, Treasurer, Member; Scholastic Books and Troll Books: Book Fair Chairperson(in NY & PA) from 1992- 2008; Parent Representative for The Kiski School with the Fund for Advancement of Minorities through Education Foundation (FAME) AND for Sewickley Academy with Fame and the POISE Foundation from 2008-2017. Gov. Rendell did a costing out study to find out how much money it would take to adequately educate a child in PA. The study showed that the two school districts that received the most State and Federal money because they had the highest need: Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, had the lowest performing students. https://www.stateboard.education.pa.gov/Documents/Research%20 Reports%20and%20Studies/PA%20Costing%20Out%20Study%20 rev%2012%2007.pdf There is some factually incorrect and racially incendiary information in the referenced article in the questionnaire. Gov. Rendell also warned the school districts to PREPARE for the future because the stimulus money was not permanent. Very little stimulus money actually went into educational resources and programming. The stimulus money was squandered on luxuries including but, not limited to increased administrative salaries and junket trips; and state of the art athletic facilities. Gov. Corbett didn’t cut Education funding; the stimulus money ran out. In the City of Pittsburgh there are very few textbooks. The students receive photocopies. So where did the textbook money that was allocated GO?? The school districts in Democratic led areas are struggling, because the school officials bring the same foolish: “who cares about the budget; WE will spend (ie. waste) however WE choose; and simply raise the school taxes to cover the spending” mentality to education. Because of the 10th Amendment, there are many things that are only part of the Federal government’s oversight of Pennsylvania’s uniform compliance with the existing federal legislation. So unless there is a need for me to sponsor new legislation, my Freshman role is limited. However, I will offer some solutions. And once elected, I will use my office to help fund creative education initiatives whenever legally possible; and enthusiastically support any innovative ideas in the 18th Congressional District. LOCAL Elections matter. The PA Assembly/Legislature and the Local School Boards control the day to day operation of schools in Pennsylvania. Federal legislation provides additional funding, and ensures that there is no discrimination or bias; and that there are basic guidelines and requirements for all 50 States, DC and the 5 US Territories for uniformity of Education across the USA. 1- Communities need to advocate for fiscal responsibility; and cultivate and FINANCE school board candidates that actually care about children being properly educated. 2- PA has too many school districts. The current 500 districts is too many districts for a state with a high senior population and a dwindling youth population. School districts MUST merge to be more fiscally responsible and competitive. 250 districts would be an optimum number of school districts but, 300 is probably a more realistic goal. In 2007, labor was 80% of all school districts operating costs (see pg 22. of the aforementioned Costing Out Study). And it is at least 80% of the budget in 2020, because several school districts have increased teacher salaries. This is not sustainable unless you put an extraordinarily high extra financial burden, on the already overtaxed residents. 3- There need to be audits of EVERY school district to see exactly what the remaining 20% of the education monies is actually being spent on. Eliminate the fraud, waste and abuse immediately. Redirect those monies into better programming and educational support for STUDENTS. 4- The Teachers Union: PSEA, IS the enemy of education in PA. Their focus is primarily on exorbitant pensions and undeserved salary raises that are not sustainable. Why should taxpayers continue to reward teachers that poorly educate their children?? No other industry rewards bad performance with tenure and pay raises. Teachers’ performance should be evaluated yearly; like our students’ performance is evaluated yearly. Eliminate tenure! Provide financial and continuing education incentives to existing teachers who are creative and innovative. Provide incentives to encourage new teacher recruitment. 5- Restore Gov. Wolf’s cuts to charter schools AND offer REAL school choice with vouchers/scholarships for parents to send their children to their choice of: charter, private, independent, parochial, or even homeschool instead of their local failing school districts. 6- Increase public-private partnerships in failing school districts and seek funding from them. “The Pittsburgh Promise” is an excellent initiative that encourages young families to settle in Pittsburgh. Local school districts need to cultivate public-private partnerships with businesses in their communities to spur more funding for their Pre K-12 innovative ideas in Education, and to recruit young families. 7- Education in PA after COVID-19: Because students are currently distance learning; I believe that continuing the distance learning may be an unexpected answer to the biggest educational problems in PA. A- How can we socially distance in already overcrowded classrooms?? B- Will parents have the trust to send their children back to their local physical school buildings? C- If Parents actually want distance learning or if distance learning is mandatory, it could work well. IF the school districts provides EVERY student with a laptop or tablet based on grade level; and provides the corresponding needed materials, including access to online enrichment and supplemental materials; access to virtual tutoring; and EVERY home has high speed internet access, that would actually be cheaper because the 80% LABOR costs would be reduced significantly. Transportation costs would be greatly reduced or eliminated. The special needs provisions that are currently in place can be continued; and the free lunch meals that are being provided can be continued as well. The PA Secretary of Education would have to approve the curriculum and the US Secretary of Education will have to adapt existing federal regulations and formulate uniform national regulations and standards. D- If local school resumes with social distancing, school districts are going to need much more money to implement the changes; and I don’t even want to try to estimate the staggering costs of those expenditures.

Over the past two decades, crime has fallen, but the population of Allegheny County Jail rose by 70%. What can your office do to end mass incarceration, and heal the communities it has harmed the most? Which offenses will you work to decriminalize?

My office will work tirelessly to eliminate cash bail as I continue to support the First Step Act that was passed in 2017 by President Trump. I will promote incentives for hiring, job training and mentorships for returning citizens in the Qualified Opportunity Zones; continue to work with Americans for Prosperity to implement PA Probation Reform; and continue to support the new BLUPRINT initiative once it is officially launched. I will also hire qualified returning citizens to work in my local offices. I do not want to decriminalize any offenses. What I would prefer to do is to make the punishment for non-violent offenses less severe with mental health interventions; drug and alcohol counseling; community service instead of incarceration; and/or dismiss the charges if the actors have successfully met the mandatory requirements; and add more programs aimed at crime prevention and preventing recidivism in the 18th Congressional District. Lastly, I will also encourage my colleague in the 17th Congressional District to join me in these efforts to foster uniformity across all of Allegheny County.

The Pittsburgh region has the most air pollution-related deaths of any city outside of California. What measures will you take to ensure that our area’s environmental pollution and air quality improve dramatically?

I will aggressively push for the enforcement of the existing EPA Regulations. I will not burden taxpayers with additional legislation, unless there is a detrimental loophole in the existing EPA legislation. I will not burden car owners with more emissions requirements. However, I will require full compliance from buses, trucks and other commercial vehicles. And I will immediately report all violators to the appropriate law enforcement agency for any violations, and I will seek all penalties and punishment available under law.

Rising temperatures increase the intensity of floods. Precipitation from extremely heavy storms has increased by 70% in the Northeast since 1958. What can your office do to address the climate crisis, and to mitigate its effects in our area?

Frankly, I do not believe these statistics because they come from the Obama Administration. The climate does change naturally. Manmade Climate Change because of CO2 and the “Green New Deal” are hoaxes used to redistribute America’s wealth to the world. If the effects of climate change are cataclysmic why are China and India allowed to pollute with impunity?? If there was no CO2 there would be nothing GREEN on the planet. Through photosynthesis plants use chloroplasts/chlorophyll to convert CO2 into glucose and excrete O2 into the air. Furthermore, we also benefit when we eat green leafy vegetables. Lastly, I would plant more trees in the 18th District to help cleanse the air.

Nearly 700,000 Pennsylvanians do not have health insurance. How can your office ensure residents are getting the care that they need?

This article is misleading because 7000 residents lost coverage because they could not afford the balloon premiums of ObamaCare that had skyrocketed out of reach. The PA rates were lower than the national average because many people received insurance coverage with their new jobs in 2017- 2019. I will use my office to advocate for more funding from the Dept of Health and Human Services (HHS) to provide additional funds to the existing free/low cost health and dental clinics in Allegheny County in order to expand their ability to treat more patients. I will use my office to advocate for President Trump’s upcoming healthcare plan that will cover pre-existing conditions and allow dependents to stay on their parent’s until age 26. And use my office to sponsor legislation to Repeal ObamaCare once and for all. And I will sponsor legislation to eliminate the waste, fraud and abuse in Medicare and Medicaid, and to improve the eligibility guidelines and discontinue the costly spend-downs that cause many Americans to fall through the cracks.

Pittsburgh is one of the most gentrified cities in the US. How can your office work to address the rent inflation that is pushing residents farther away from the city and the greater metro area?

I will work closely with the Dept of Housing and Urban Development(HUD) to make sure that all available housing grants and subsidies are open to residents; and make sure that existing housing and rent stabilization laws are not being violated by the gentrification. I will also make sure that the rents are fair market value and not deliberately overpriced to discriminate. And unlike my predecessor Mike Doyle, I will advocate for building new housing that current residents can actually afford in the Qualified Opportunity Zones(QOZ); and I will advocate against any companies that seek to use the QOZ to gentrify the district.

Over 90,000 people in Pennsylvania earn minimum wage or less, and our minimum wage has been stagnant at $7.25/ hr since 2009. What can your office do to ensure that all PA residents are paid a fair wage, and are able to afford necessities?

The competition for jobs in this local job market is determining the starting salaries. I will use my office to create job training and readiness programs and cultivate public-private partnerships to establish internships; externships; apprenticeships and mentoring to increase residents’ earning potential. I am very surprised by these statistics because I currently see hiring signs as we are quarantined; for workers who don’t need a high school diploma or a college degree. Jobs starting at at LEAST $10 per hour. Places like Walmart, Target, Giant Eagle, Subway, Burger King, Pizza Hut, Dominos etc., are hiring. I don’t know anyone earning less than $7.25/hr. not even teenagers.

Commute times are the strongest indicator of whether a household can emerge from poverty. How can your office strengthen and support our public transportation?

I will definitely increase funding for transportation bridge programs like Heritage Worklink and ACTA 19 that provides rides for $0.25 to get even more riders to PAT Buses or to destinations along their respective routes. The Port Authority Transit(PAT) needs to be audited because the fares have gone up, but the number of buses and bus routes have been cut. I could potentially support increasing the funding for PAT after the results of an independent audit. Frankly, I think there should be another bus line in Allegheny County to foster competition and encourage more competitive fares. Port Authority should no longer have a monopoly on public transportation in this county.

Throughout the US, reproductive rights, health, and justice are under attack at the state level. What can your office do to protect and expand upon existing rights to bodily autonomy?

I am Pro-Life. Abortion is Black Genocide. PERIOD I actively and passionately advocate for life unequivocally. We have 3D ultrasound so we Know that these are viable babies not fetuses. I want Planned Parenthood defunded because they don’t just kill babies up to delivery at 40 weeks, they sell the baby parts and blood for profit. It’s amazing and pure EVIL that churches are closed during the quarantine but Planned Parenthood was considered essential and remained open. By the way there are more than 10K free and reduced clinics in America so the “healthcare” provided by Planned Parenthood is not necessary. I advocate for life at every level, but I would be willing to sponsor; co-sponsor AND VOTE for ANY PRO-LIFE LEGISLATION that comes before me.

What can your office do to increase voter representation and engagement?

I can sponsor local voter registration and engagement events and have voter registration tables in my offices; and at every public appearance that I make.

Mike Doyle, Democrat • Incumbent

No photo provided

Mike Doyle, US Congressional Representative

Mike Doyle did not submit a questionnaire response.

 

Luke Negron, Republican • Challenger

No photo provided

Luke Negron, US Congressional Candidate

Luke Negron did not submit a questionnaire response.